Physics

Green’s Function for the Heat Equation

Posted on Updated on

The Green’s function is a powerful tool of mathematics method is used in solving some linear non-homogenous PDEs, ODEs. So Green’s functions are derived by the specially development method of separation of variables, which uses the properties of Dirac’s function.

Sturm-Liouville problem
Sturm-Liouville problem

This method was considerable more efficient than the others well known classical methods. The series solution of differential equation yields an infinite series which often converges slowly. Thus it is difficult to obtain an insight into over-all behavior of the solution. The Green’s function approach would allow us to have an integral representation of the solution instead of an infinite series.  Read More>>>>

Molecular Beacon-Based Microrna Biosensor for Imaging EPC-Treated Cellular Therapy of Ischemia

Posted on Updated on

Angiogenesis are basic processes of new blood vessels formation. Vasculogenesis entails the differentiation of mesodermal cells into endothelial precursor cells. When vascular damage is occurred, vessels are able to regenerate via angiogenesis, which is formation of blood vessel from pre-existing blood vessel by the sprouting, splitting, and remodeling of the vascular network.

Isolation of mononuclear cell population from cord blood
Isolation of mononuclear cell population from cord blood

Since the discovery of endothelial precursor cells (EPCs) has been believed that vasculogenesis be able to occur in adult, they have used for the application of cell therapy using putative endothelial cell population for several vascular diseases. With this cell therapy concept several kinds of cellular sources which obtained from adult source were highlighted as stem cell reservoir, including cord blood, peripheral blood, fat, bone marrow, liver, and etc.  Read More>>>>>>>

A Simple and Efficient Methodology for the Study of Cardioprotective Drugs in Animal Model of Cardiac Ischemia-Reperfusion

Posted on Updated on

Recent studies suggest that ischemic cardiac diseases can cause 26 million of deaths per year in worldwide after 2030. Among the ischemic cardiac diseases, acute myocardial infarction (AMI) represents the most common cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide.

Typical ECG records showing ventricular arrythmias (VA)
Typical ECG records

The coronary reperfusion therapy constitutes the major therapeutic strategy to salvage the myocardium from tissue injury following prolonged ischemia in AMI patients. However, the beneficial effects of this therapy are compromised by myocardial injuries caused during coronary reperfusion that subsequently lead to cardiac dysfunctions, including arrhythmias. Read More>>>>>>>>>>

Comparative Study on the Binding Affinity of Methimazole and Propylthiouracil to Thyroid Peroxidase as an Anti-Thyroid Drug

Posted on Updated on

Graves’ disease (GD) is an autoimmune Thyroid disorder (AITD), typically characterized by the presence of thyrotoxicosis, goiter, and ophthalmopathy (Grave’s ophthalmopathy). It is one of the major causes of hyperthyroidism in the geographical areas with Iodine abundance. GD has reported a frequency of 20-30 cases per 100,000 individuals each year, with the possibility 3% of women and 0.5% of men acquiring GD during their lifetime.

Methimazole
Methimazole
Propylthiouracil
Methimazole

 

The main ground cause of GD is the binding of circulating IgG antibodies to G-protein– coupled thyrotropin receptor (TSHR), resulting in the activation of Thyroglobulin gene which codes for thyroid hormonestriiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). Read More>>>>>>>>>>>>

Effect of C-Terminal Truncations on the Aggregation Propensity of Α- Synuclein

Posted on Updated on

α-Synuclein (α-syn) is a cellular acidic protein of 140 amino acid residues that release neurotransmitters in the presynaptic nerve terminals  and whose abnormal aggregation results at the onset of Parkinson’s disease (PD).

C-Terminal Truncations
C-Terminal Truncations

Accumulation of α-syn fibrils in neuronal inclusions is the major pathological process involved in PD. PD is a neuro-degenerative disorder, sporadically affecting nearly 10 million people around the world and associated with common ageing of a person. It is considered to be a progressive and movement disorder which results in slow movement and develops cardinal symptoms such as tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity and postural instability.  Read More>>>>>>>

Controlled Molecular Targeting of Inducible Heat Shock Proteins

Posted on Updated on

The ability to control the site-specific delivery of drugs on demand may circumvent many of the pharmacological dilemmas in achieving desired cytotoxicity to malignant tumors or sites of diseased tissue versus reducing systemic toxicity. Given the relatively nonselective nature of most anticancer agents, the therapeutic index is often narrow for otherwise highly potent drugs.

Inducible Heat Shock Proteins
Inducible Heat Shock Proteins

We have approached this problem by postulating that drug delivery may be better controlled if specific targets could be reliably altered by external means. Ideally, such an approach would require methods that were both noninvasive and inconsequential in terms of locoregional or systemic adverse effects. Capitalizing on known physical methods for inducing localized hyperthermia, for example through the use of focused ultrasound, we sought to identify suitable endogenous targets that could be highly overexpressed.  Read More>>>>>>>>>

Communication Attitude of Slovenian Preschool Children who do and do not Stutter

Posted on Updated on

Researchers have documented that a statistically significant difference in communication attitude exists when comparing adults, school-age children and preschool children who stutter to their peers who speak fluently. Adults and school-age children who stutter show statistically significantly more negative speech-related attitude than their normally fluent peers.

Preschool Children
Preschool Children who do and do not Stutter

A statistically significant difference in the scores on the Communication Attitude Test (CAT) between the six-year-old children who stutter (CWS) and those whose speech is fluent (CWNS), led the researchers to hypothesize that the presence of a difference in communication attitude before the age of six was very likely. The fact that children as young as age three years perceive the difference between fluent and non-fluent speech, and indicate a preference of a fluent communication partner over a dysfluent one, already pointed to the presence of awareness of stuttering at this young age.  Read More>>>>>>>